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CARIBBEAN REEF FISH GUIDE RELATED ,

Reef Fish Identification - Florida Caribbean Bahamas - 4th Edition (Reef Set)

$14.77


Caribbean Reef Fish of Southern Mexico | Project Noah

The data on Caribbean reef fish being collected by Ken and Dave will be synthesized with scientific data our team has been recording on habitat types, coral cover, coral diseases and invertebrate populations, so that reef ecologists can assess the overall health and resilience of the Hogsty Reef and Inaguas coral reef ecosystems.
Written by Kit van Wagner

The data on Caribbean reef fish being collected by Ken and Dave will be synthesized with scientific data our team has been recording on habitat types, coral cover, coral diseases and invertebrate populations, so that reef ecologists can assess the overall health and resilience of the Hogsty Reef and Inaguas coral reef ecosystems.
Written by Kit van Wagner

Unique caribbean reef fish related items | Etsy

THE CARIBBEAN REEF FISH SPECIES LIST
(including the Gulf of Mexico)

Fish families following Randall's book, but with updated, expanded, and revised species lists
excluding elasmobranchs, but including numerous species found in non-reef habitats (if the family has reef-associated members); also excluding some sets of deep-water species (over ~30 m depth)

 

caribbean reef fish - karinfuturetranslator

So far, Ken and Dave have noted a couple of interesting things about the Caribbean reef fish they have seen on Hogsty Reef and Great Inagua. On other Caribbean reefs, there are typically more grasbys than coneys. Generally, the divers would count ten grasbys for every one coney. On this leg of the Global Reef Expedition, the complete opposite has been observed. Curiously, coneys are abundant here, far outnumbering the grasby population. In addition, the princess parrotfish in the Inaguas are far more plentiful than the very similar striped parrotfish. The opposite is true in most other parts of the Bahamas and the Caribbean. The reasons for these number reversals are not readily apparent and the mystery intrigues our scientists. The divers have also noted a virtual absence of grunts and porgies. Dave and Ken believe this may be because the Inaguas do not have the large seagrass beds needed to support their primary diet of nocturnal invertebrates.

So far, Ken and Dave have noted a couple of interesting things about the Caribbean reef fish they have seen on Hogsty Reef and Great Inagua. On other Caribbean reefs, there are typically more grasbys than coneys. Generally, the divers would count ten grasbys for every one coney. On this leg of the Global Reef Expedition, the complete opposite has been observed. Curiously, coneys are abundant here, far outnumbering the grasby population. In addition, the princess parrotfish in the Inaguas are far more plentiful than the very similar striped parrotfish. The opposite is true in most other parts of the Bahamas and the Caribbean. The reasons for these number reversals are not readily apparent and the mystery intrigues our scientists. The divers have also noted a virtual absence of grunts and porgies. Dave and Ken believe this may be because the Inaguas do not have the large seagrass beds needed to support their primary diet of nocturnal invertebrates.