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Coastal Fishing in the Carolinas: From Surf, Pier, and Jetty

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Great White Sharks fishing report South Carolina

Beaufort, South Carolina is roughly a 13 hour drive for me when you factor in a few lazy stops. Despite the long hike, as I wrote a few weeks ago, I was eager to get back out chasing redfish. My previous trip, and first time seeking to catch a few of these amazing fish, was fairly successful. Heading back during the prime season for redfish in South Carolina, I was pretty stoked. As it turns out, how excited you are for a fishing trip has no influence on how productive it is, a lesson I'm pretty sure I've learned several times before.

Tarpon migrate annually to South Carolina waters. Their much anticipated arrival typically starts in late May and many of these tarpon will stay until the water begins to drop below 70 degrees, which often doesn’t occur until the middle part of October. The best months for tarpon fishing in South Carolina are August and September during the annual Mullet run. This event triggers a large scale feeding frenzy as large tarpon and many other predator fish take advantage of the available groceries(mullet and menhaden). On average, the larger tarpon are caught in South Carolina later in the season, and fish in excess of 130 lbs are common.

Spring Time Bass Fishing South Carolina

Fishing the South Carolina Lowcountry

Basic

Fly Fishing South Carolina's Salt Flats

The tarpon action continues to improve as more fish are showing up by the day. We’ve been having 2-3 shots per trip lately fishing along the beaches south of Myrtle Beach and in Winyah Bay. Many of these ocean swimming fish are still on their migration north and can be found just beyond the surf feeding around schools of menhaden. My good friend Blair Googer caught his first tarpon of the season that we estimated to weight 130lbs. Late Summer and early fall should be another epic year tarpon fishing in South Carolina.

Tarpon migrate annually to South Carolina waters. Their much anticipated arrival typically starts in late May and many of these tarpon will stay until the water begins to drop below 70 degrees, which often doesn’t occur until the middle part of October. The best months for tarpon fishing in South Carolina are August and September during the annual Mullet run. This event triggers a large scale feeding frenzy as large tarpon and many other predator fish take advantage of the available groceries(mullet and menhaden). On average, the larger tarpon are caught in South Carolina later in the season, and fish in excess of 130 lbs are common.